The crew

People listening to our most recent Coriolis Actual Play may have picked up on a few “references” – from a start, and a bad guy, inspired by the movie The Bad Batch, through scavengers modelled after Steptoe and Son (which our American listeners may know better as Sanford and Son) to a wrecked ship absolutely and openly based on the Liberator from Blakes 7

But when it came to the creatures infesting that ruined ship, it was the Coriolis rulebook I turned to. I didn’t really find what I was looking for, but I did find some inspiration. And this is the story of how I riffed on that inspiration, fudged the details, and tested my half-formed ideas in play. 

The inspiration came from a creature that was almost what I wanted: “The darkbound are regular people that are somehow claimed by the Dark between the stars.”

Until that point, I hadn’t decided whether the creatures I wanted were native to the planet, creatures of the Darkness, or as suggested here, fellow prisoners who were somehow changed. And given that the adventure is partly about how prisoners are changed by exile, it struck me, on reading about the Darkbound, it was suddenly obvious that my creatures should be changed prisoners. The description for the darkbound seemed perfect too, looking “like a thin and twisted human, with only a few torn patches of hair left, and with burning eyes and long claws instead of fingers.”

But the real inspiration came from their mystic power. They only have one – well, arguably they have a couple but more on that later. The only power which is most actually described mechanically is NIGHT VEIL. I won’t quote it here  but in short, it is a mental attack. It does not deal out mind-point damage, but it does make it difficult to think , with a -2 modifier on roles for observation, advanced skills and initiative. Now, I didn’t actually use that attack per se, but the idea suddenly made sense of what my creatures were, how they came to be, and the nature of the AI, Qadim, and the ship itself. 

Fans of Blake’s 7 may remember the ship’s computer, Zen.  When I started planning my adventure, I imagined an advanced AI like Zen, having been ripped out of its ship, enlisting the PCs to get him fitted back back in. The Darkbound’s mystic power unlocked a deluge of different, better, ideas. 

What if the relationship between Qadim and the ship was more complex? What if Qadim was the rational thinking part of the ship, the ego? And when it was ripped out what was left behind was the id, the instinctive, feeling part? What if both parts of the ship were damaged by the separation? Qadim can calculate and communicate but it can’t really understand the humans it works with because it has to fake empathy.  I’m going to say it’s autistic, while recognising that’s a massive oversimplification of a complex condition. 

Meanwhile, the ship, which Dave called Starsinger, but I am going to call Siren, can feel, and emote, it can run subroutines, and try to repair itself but it can’t really communicate. It moans, it sings it’s despair.  And it’s that which makes it difficult to think. It’s not a mystic attack at all – the longer you spend in the ship, the closer you get to where Qadim had been ripped out, the harder it becomes to make a wits roll. Mechanically I ran this as a -2 penalty to any wits based skill roll when they were in the chamber which is equivalent to the bridge (but I think I’d recommend doing it slightly differently in future). 

So these creatures are not the perpetrators of the mind-dimming effect, but it’s victims. Previous salvagers who spent too long in the vessel, and literally lost their wits. It’s more than that though, they have been transformed in other ways by prolonged exposure to the song of the Siren. They have become automata, part of the ship’s systems. I wanted the alien technology to feel properly alien, unknowable. I wanted it to be composed of strange sealed units that would be absolutely baffling to my engineer. So I imagined these creatures bodies were so changed by the influence of the Siren, long longer eating, sustained only by the song, that they are almost etherial, they can reach into the strange machinery of the ship to maintain and operate it.

They also needed to be a threat to the PCs though, and I had stolen their only mystic power to use as a more general effect. Well, I say it is their only power, and if you look at their stat-block, it is the only one listed. But the description mentions a couple of others, they “move incredibly fast, closing in on their victims in the blink of an eye to sink their claws into them.” And “Just the touch of a dark-bound can paralyze someone completely.” So I treated their touch like a paralysing poison, activating it not on “just the touch”, but when they actually do damage to a PC. 

I didn’t want them to be too aggressive though, so I wanted some sort of trigger for an attack. Thinking back to the separation of Qadim’s ego from the Siren’s id, I decided that they would only attack when a PC would try to reason with them, talk to them, so unused were they to communicating in anything other than the raw emotion of The Siren. I liked the idea that they might now be integral to the operation of the ship, and that, if they manage to get off planet in the Siren, the PCs would have to put up with them scuttling around and also remember not to talk whenever they were nearby. 

So I was done. However testing them in the play, I decided that, for our ill- equipped adventurers, the paralysis power could be … not dangerous, exactly, but not fun. Combined with their natural speed I saw that it could easily create a situation where the whole party was paralysed, and though they might not be dead (why would the creatures kill them if they were quiet) it might be a very frustrating experience. And the scenario was already frustrating enough. So I am thinking instead about a mystic power which, for the cost of a darkness point, allows them to ignore the effects of PC armour (and maybe, for another DP, makes it easy for them to inflict unarmed crits). 

Finally I needed a name, because I feel these creatures are now quite different from the Darkbound that inspired them. I have called them Aabdel’rd, a corruption of an Arabic word that means, simply, crew. 

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The Coriolis Effect – Season 2 Episode 8

 

If you go down to the woods alone, you’re in for a big surprise.

Sitting around the same mic for a change, we talk over each other just as much, as we discuss Forbidden Lands 121, creatures from our recent AP and the OGL.

00.00.39: Introduction
00.05.30: World of Gaming – Nemisis boardgame, and looking forward to Western, Things from the Flood and Flying Circus
00.21.24: Forbidden Lands One-to-one – with a Hat Tip to Tom Pleasant (and Jonathan Friendly, whoever HE is…)
00.45.16: The Aabdel’rd
01.04.27: The Year Zero Open Game Licence
01.10.25: We talk about next episode and say goodbye

The Coriolis Effect. Presented by FictionSuit and the RPG Gods. With music by Stars on a Black Sea, used with permission of Free League Publishing. Imagery from NASA and the Hubble Space telescope, brought to you by wikimedia commons. Typeface is Code by Fontfabric

Song to the Siren Part 5: Siren

In the final part of our current Coriolis RPG Actual Play, Salem, Salah and Yaphet set out to “the Temple”, which they are convinced is the space ship that will they need to escape the prison planet. What they find isn’t quite what they were expecting.

Song to the Siren, a Coriolis Effect Actual Play. Presented by FictionSuit and the RPG Gods. With music by Stars on a Black Sea, used with permission of Free League Publishing. Imagery from NASA and the Hubble Space telescope, brought to you by wikimedia commons. Typeface is Code by Fontfabric.

 

Song to the Siren Part 4: Qadim

In the fourth part of our Coriolis Actual Play, Salem, Salah and Yaphet finally meet the mysterious leader of Club Topeka, Qadim.

Song to the Siren, a Coriolis Effect Actual Play. Presented by FictionSuit and the RPG Gods. With music by Stars on a Black Sea, used with permission of Free League Publishing. Imagery from NASA and the Hubble Space telescope, brought to you by wikimedia commons. Typeface is Code by Fontfabric.

 

Song to the Siren Part 3: Club

In the third part of our Coriolis RPG Actual Play recording, Club Topeka welcomes three new members – Salah, Salem and Yaphet

Song to the Siren, a Coriolis Effect Actual Play. Presented by FictionSuit and the RPG Gods. With music by Stars on a Black Sea, used with permission of Free League Publishing. Imagery from NASA and the Hubble Space telescope, brought to you by wikimedia commons. Typeface is Code by Fontfabric.

 

Song to the Siren Part 2: Trade

In the second part of our current Actual Play, Salem, Salah and Yaphet flee Harvest with a cargo of bound prisoners and meet the trader, Willa and his nephew.

Song to the Siren, a Coriolis Effect Actual Play. Presented by FictionSuit and the RPG Gods. With music by Stars on a Black Sea, used with permission of Free League Publishing. Imagery from NASA and the Hubble Space telescope, brought to you by wikimedia commons. Typeface is Code by Fontfabric.

 

Song to the Siren Part 1: Arrival

In the first part of a long awaited Actual Play return to the Coriolis RPG, the brothers Salah and Yaphet, and their Humanite pilot Salem find themselves shipless. Tried and found guilty for a crime they definitely did commit, they are transported in stasis pods to an unknown planet, where their pods are jettisoned into the atmosphere…

Song to the Siren, a Coriolis Effect Actual Play. Presented by FictionSuit and the RPG Gods. With music by Stars on a Black Sea, used with permission of Free League Publishing. Imagery from NASA and the Hubble Space telescope, brought to you by wikimedia commons. Typeface is Code by Fontfabric.

The Coriolis Effect – Season 2 Episode 7

Gruesome Deaths at Dragonmeet!

We talk Kickstarter fulfillment; Dragonmeet adventures; and what to do with too many Darkness Points. We also interview Nils and Mattias; and Coriolis GM Remi Feyomi (pictured above with fellow gamer John Dove) is our “Player in the Hamam”.

00.00.39: Introduction
00.06.24: World of Gaming – Forbidden Lands delivery! Forbidden Lands delivery problems! Emissary Lost delivery! Nibiru Kickstarter
00.25.22: Dragonmeet 2018 – how it went, especially our Forbidden Lands Grindbone Challenge
00.33.16: Interview: Nils and Mattias from Free League
00.56.40: Players in the Hamam – Remi Fayomi
01.11.38: Spectral Corsair update, and we discuss the “Darkness Point glut” problem
01.22.35: Next episode; Seasons greetings; and goodbye

*There is a more than usual political commentary in this episode, please excuse a couple of citizens of a country with an apparently incompetent political class. Normal service will be resumed next episode.

The Coriolis Effect. Presented by FictionSuit and the RPG Gods. With music by Stars on a Black Sea, used with permission of Free League Publishing. Imagery from NASA and the Hubble Space telescope, brought to you by wikimedia commons. Typeface is Code by Fontfabric

Democracy in Action

A few weeks ago after episode 2.6 we ran a poll (or three) on whether we should play (and record) Coriolis or Forbidden Lands. We don’t play on line, and we don’t get together often, less than once a month, to play around a table. Given that we have traditionally taken turns GMing, it means that we might only play a couple of sessions on each game a year. Dave is running Symbaroum, Tony runs L5R, Andy, Savage World of Solomon Kane, so this poll has been about what I run. We are all enjoying both games, so this is a real quandary.

So, we asked our listeners. I put a poll on Facebook, Twitter and G+. It’s interesting to see how differently each “constituency” (users of each social platform reacted).

I put the poll on all three platforms in the same day. People responded quickly to the ones on Twitter and G+, less quickly to Facebook. I automatically shared my poll post on G+ with the Coriolis and Forbidden Lands groups, but I didn’t think to do that at first on Facebook. When I noticed how low the response rate was on Facebook, I shared it with each game’s group and the respondents came – in the end Facebook returned the most answers.

Twitter responses started well, outpacing Facebook on the first day, but in the end returned the fewest responses. You can set how long the poll lasts on Twitter and Facebook. For Twitter I thought it wouldn’t not last long, and set it for three days. I might as well have set it for one day though, given the nature of Twitter, most responded on the first day, I might have got a couple more on day two. Nothing in three.

As you can see nine people voted Forbidden Lands, six Coriolis. A win for Forbidden Lands it seems. But Twitter is our smallest constituency. Let look the next largest. G+ doesn’t let you set a time for polls. To end it, you just delete the post. Which isn’t very satisfactory – people can’t check if I am telling the truth about what the vote was. I would write to Google to tell them to fix it, if they weren’t shuttering the whole thing. Anyhow, the G+ poll lasted over a week. And saw the scales tipping one way, and then the other before:

The G+ poll was the last to close, and before I finally deleted the post I took this screen grab. Thirty two votes for each game. The G+ constituency was just as divided as we were.

And so we turn to Facebook. I already mentioned that, in the end, the Facebook constituency returned the most votes, enough to tilt the scales back in the Coriolis direction, or was Facebook too more balanced?

97 votes, and another small but clear majority for Forbidden Lands.

So Forbidden Lands is the clear winner. It’s also interesting to note that the Forbidden Lands AP episode that we released a month or two ago, are already becoming out most popular downloads. Session Zero, for example, is already our sixth most downloaded episode ever. So the next game I will run in the new year will be Forbidden Lands. We won’t forget Coriolis though, in fact the next AP to be released will be our Coriolis adventure Song to the Siren, which we recorded back in November, just as soon as I get round to editing it.

So in conclusion: this is what we are expecting to put out over the next few weeks

  • This week: The fifth and final episode of our current Symbaroum adventure Troubled Spirits
  • Next week: Episode 2.7 of The Coriolis Effect, with reports and interviews from Dragonmeet
  • Then: weekly releases of only our second Coriolis AP. The crew find themselves marooned on a prison planet in Song to the Siren
  • After Christmas more The Coriolis Effect, and from Dragonmeet, The Grindbone Slave Tournament